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Drugs in schools

Most drug violations in CPS involve an ounce or less of marijuana. Schools are quick to call police, yet rarely have the resources to offer education, counseling or other non-punitive help to students.

In the News: Combining education curriculum with teaching experiences; SOTU emphasizes education

Wells' Urban Teachers Academy combines an education curriculum with classroom teaching experience in a nearby elementary school. The program is among several college and career track programs launched this year at 11 Chicago public high schools. Modeled after one started in Broward County, Fla., high schools more than 10 years ago, organizers hope to eventually include college scholarship offers and a job guarantee that will bring students back to teach at district schools. (Tribune)

Wells' Urban Teachers Academy combines an education curriculum with classroom teaching experience in a nearby elementary school. The program is among several college and career track programs launched this year at 11 Chicago public high schools. Modeled after one started in Broward County, Fla., high schools more than 10 years ago, organizers
hope to eventually include college scholarship offers and a job guarantee that will bring students back to teach at district schools. (Tribune)

Hundreds of charter school supporters and detractors are expected to attend a Chicago Public Schools board meeting Wednesday, hoping to influence a vote on whether to open more of the independently run public schools, the Tribune reports. The Illinois Network of Charter Schools plans to bus 500 parents to the meeting. The Renaissance Schools Fund, a nonprofit group that raises money for charter schools in Chicago, plans Wednesday to release results from a poll it commissioned that shows 70 percent of city residents and 3 in 4 CPS parents want more school choices.

iPads are changing the learning curve for students in 22 Chicago Public Schools that received the devices as part of a pilot program. (Medill Reports)

In the state

After a financial meltdown and nine years under the control of the state of Illinois, the Round Lake Area Schools District 116 is is expected to shake state control in June — one year early. (Tribune)

Some employees in Glenbrook High School District 225 could be offered an early retirement option if the Board of Education approves a proposal next month. (Trib Local)

In the nation

President Barack Obama used his State of the Union address tonight to put education front-and-center on the national agenda, and on the agenda of the newly divided Congress. And he tied his education proposals, including the long-stalled reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, directly to the nation's economic future.  (Education Week)

On the most recent nationwide science test, about a third of fourth graders and a fifth of high school seniors scored at or above the proficiency level, according to results released Tuesday.  (The New York Times)

Several dozen K-12 educators traveled to the Indiana Statehouse to convince lawmakers to slow down the legislative pace of change in education. (Herald Bulletin)

Milwaukee Public Schools recently announced it will revamp its entire math and science curriculum from kindergarten through 12th grade with the help of a $20.4 million grant from the GE Foundation. The decision came before results of a national science assessment released Tuesday raised concerns about the state's African-American student achievement and about scientific literacy in general. The difference in average science scores between the state's black and white eighth-graders was the highest in the nation, according to the latest results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, also known as the nation's report card. (Journal Sentinel)

2 comments

Lynn wrote 3 years 37 weeks ago

Great to hear that Wells is creating a spark for many kids

I love to hear stories of schools (not districts) making decisions that help students to be their best selves. It really appears that Wells principal Matias took the time to listen to his students' hopes to become our next educators and he turned it into a hands-on program. I'll be interested to see how it goes at Curie. CPS should learn from Matias that schools know their kids and their communities and can make solid decisions to keep them engaged and learning. Even if it can't be replicated everywhere (as CPS is famous for trying one size fits all approaches), it still sounds fantastic.

President Obama's State of the Union speech wrote 3 years 37 weeks ago

In the News: Combining education curriculum with teaching experi

can be read in its entirety by going to http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2011/01/25/remarks-president-...

I think it is important for teachers and parents to actually read what the President said last night about education, because just listening to the speech or digesting summaries such as those Alexander has provided links to do not situate the President's thoughts on the issue appropriately. When one reads the speech it is striking that the President's comments on education were completely situated within the framework of global economic competition. Here is how the President began the education section of the State of the Union speech: "But if we want to win the future -– if we want innovation to produce jobs in America and not overseas -– then we also have to win the race to educate our kids."

In my opinion there is no economic relationship between high end design, innovation, math and science skills and significant numbers of jobs in our economy. The truth of the matter is that there are far too many people in the United States for the bulk of the work force to be employed in jobs that require a college education, particularly in the math and science sectors. The driving force in job creation because of global competition are low wages combined with work discipline. Six out of the ten occupational categories that are expected to grow the fastest over the next decade are low-wage jobs. In 2010 nearly 43 percent of all job openings required only a minimal education.

The President said in his speech last night: "Over the next 10 years, nearly half of all new jobs will require education that goes beyond a high school education." According to the best data I have seen, that comes from the work of Lawrence Mishel of the Economic policy institute, only 31.4% of employed workers in our nation have a BA degree or better. About 58% of the workforce have no type of post secondary degree at all.

The implication of the President's vision of increasing college graduates is that a surge of college graduates, can be expected to drive the average college graduates wages down. Wage inequality would diminish in the US, by pressing college graduate wages down towards the levels of high school graduates. As Mr. Mishel has stated this is "not the picture frequently painted of the future," and certainly not the picture the President painted in his speech last night.

Here is what the Bureau of Labor statistics currently presents as the high growth jobs of the future in terms of numbers ( go to http://www.bls.gov/news.release/ecopro.t06.htm) and the education level associated with the occupation. The projected increase number is measured from year 2008 to 2018.

Registered nurses will increase 581,000 jobs by 2018. Requires an Associate's degree.

Home health aides will increase 461,000 jobs by 2018. High school degree preferred with some on the job training.

Customer service representatives will increase 400,000 jobs by 2018. High school degree preferred with some on the job training.

Combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food will increase 394,000 jobs by 2018. No educational requirements.

Personal and home care aides will increase 376,000 jobs by 2018. No educational requirements.

Retail salespersons will increase 375,000 jobs by 2018. Educational requirements vary but BA not generally required.

Office clerks, general office workers will increase 359,000 jobs by 2018. Educational requirements vary but BA not generally required.

Accountants and auditors will increase 279,000 jobs by 2018. BA required.

Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants will increase 276,000 jobs by 2018. High school degree with post secondary vocational certification.

Postsecondary teachers will increase 257,000 jobs by 2018. MA minimum, PhD in many cases.

Construction laborers Construction laborers will increase 256,000 jobs by 2018. No educational requirements.

Elementary school teachers will increase 244,000 jobs by 2018. BA required.

Truck drivers, heavy and tractor-trailer will increase 233,000 jobs by 2018. No educational requirements.

Landscaping and grounds keeping workers will increase 217,000 jobs by 2018. No educational requirements.

Bookkeeping, accounting, and auditing clerks will increase 217,000 jobs by 2018. Associate's degree preferred.

Executive secretaries and administrative assistants will increase 205,000 jobs by 2018. Educational requirements vary.

Management analysts will increase 178,000 jobs by 2018. MBA to BA.

Computer software engineers, applications will increase 175,000 jobs by 2018. BS or higher.

Receptionists and information clerks will increase 173,000 jobs by 2018. No educational requirements.

Carpenters will increase 165,000 jobs by 2018. No educational requirements.

Medical assistants will increase 164,000 jobs by 2018. Associate's degree.

I think it is clear from just the data from the BLS that I have provided that there is something wrong with the President's vision of education and job creation. But the public education sector has bought into this vision, hook line and sinker.

Rod Estvan

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