Become a Catalyst member

Join the conversation

We encourage our readers to leave comments and engage in dialogue about our stories. But before you do, please check out our "rules of the road."

Subscribe to catalyst-chicago.org by e-mail

catalyst-chicago.org feeds

Current Issue

College and careers

An overhaul of the district’s career education programs seeks to make classes more challenging and put career-track students on the path to higher ed, but many schools have lost programs, and fewer students are participating overall.

In the News: pension confusion, turnaround aid

Pension changes frustrate Chicago teachers who seek clear answers on how much they’ll have in retirement. (Fox)

Related: pink-slipped teachers statewide face similar confusion. (ISN)

* Ed Department officials have cleared the way for some high schools to track seniors’ college aid applications. The effort is modeled on a similar Chicago Public Schools project and spearheaded by former CPS staffer Greg Darnieder. (Chronicle of Higher Education)

* Police say 17-year-old shooting victim refused to name his murderer, another example of the code of silence that frustrates many investigations. (Sun-Times)

* Republican gubernatorial candidate Bill Brady wants to remove the Illinois State Board of Education’s policy-setting authority. In what is being pitched as a budget cutting move, Brady would have the agency serve only as an advisor to the governor. (KMOX)

Pension changes frustrate Chicago teachers who seek clear answers on how much they’ll have in retirement. (Fox)

Related: pink-slipped teachers statewide face similar confusion. (ISN)

* Ed Department officials have cleared the way for some high schools to track seniors’ college aid applications. The effort is modeled on a similar Chicago Public Schools project and spearheaded by former CPS staffer Greg Darnieder. (Chronicle of Higher Education)

* Police say 17-year-old shooting victim refused to name his murderer, another example of the code of silence that frustrates many investigations. (Sun-Times)

 

In state news

* Republican gubernatorial candidate Bill Brady wants to remove the Illinois State Board of Education’s policy-setting authority. In what is being pitched as a budget cutting move, Brady would have the agency serve only as an advisor to the governor. (KMOX)

* Despite the financial crisis, average pay for school superintendents up 3.7 percent. (The Southern)

* Judge strongly suggests a settlement for Elgin families who are suing District U46 for allegedly forcing black and Latino students into older, overcrowded schools. (Daily Herald)

"You know, I read the papers, so I read about U46 all the time. It seems that they're a distressed school district. I don't understand why this case is still kicking around. It would seem to me that they have better things to spend their money on than litigation," Judge Robert W. Gettleman remarked at a hearing last week.

Related: U46 unveils tight budget proposal.

* Springfield School Board officials consider sales tax plan for education. (SJR)

* African Americans are 30 times more likely to be in Illinois youth prisons. (WBEZ)

 

In national news

* Some $3.5 billion in turnaround and school improvement aid is now flowing to the states. (Ed Week)

* West Virginia Board of Education sends more than 20 reform proposals to governor, hoping to place the proposals on a special session agenda and improve the state’s Race to the Top chances. (Metro News)

* Ohio releases distribution plan for R2T grants, offering minimum funding to districts as an incentive to sign onto the state’s plan. (Columbus Dispatch)

* Ed Sec. Arne Duncan reverses Bush administration on Title IX, requiring schools and colleges to show more evidence on equal opportunities in athletics. (NYT)

* Duncan is also pushing to keep Hispanic students in college. (Miami Herald)

Duncan's strategy for addressing those problems relies on revamping financial aid and high school curricula, along with a touch of social engineering.

"The absolute challenge we have is one of low expectations," Duncan said. "We have more resources than the department has ever had. We're going to try to put our money where our mouth is."

* More Duncan: hear the Secretary discuss his administration’s blueprint for revamping the Elementary and Secondary Education Act on Talk of the Nation.

Add A Comment

Add your comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
go here for more