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College and careers

An overhaul of the district’s career education programs seeks to make classes more challenging and put career-track students on the path to higher ed, but many schools have lost programs, and fewer students are participating overall.

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

In Chicago, elementary schools and high schools are suspending and expelling students at alarming rates and African American male students are bearing the brunt of these punishments. Catalyst Chicago analysis reveals that out-of-school suspensions in Chicago outpaced those in the 10 biggest school districts in the nation.  

Today, Catalyst launches the series, Reaching Black Boys, that will investigate how black male academic achievement is stunted by disproportionate and often unnecessary disciplinary measures. The series will also explore the complex relationships between African American male students and the teachers, principals and institutions that are charged with educating them.  
Reaching Black BoysIn Chicago, elementary schools and high schools are suspending and expelling students at alarming rates and African American male students are bearing the brunt of these punishments. Catalyst Chicago analysis reveals that out-of-school suspensions in Chicago outpaced those in the 10 biggest school districts in the nation.   

Today, Catalyst launches the series, Reaching Black Boys, that will investigate how black male academic achievement is stunted by disproportionate and often unnecessary disciplinary measures. The series will also explore the complex relationships between African American male students and the teachers, principals and institutions that are charged with educating them.  
Catalyst decided to tackle this issue because black male students in Chicago Public Schools lag behind their peers academically in every grade, have the highest dropout rate (54 percent) and fewer than half of those who graduate go on to college. 
Research shows that a student who is suspended just once is three times more likely to dropout than those who aren’t suspended. Yet, disproportionate suspensions and expulsions of black boys flies under the radar while CPS invests unprecedented resources into raising graduation rates. 
Advocates are aghast at the figures and wonder if they may warrant an investigation or a lawsuit. An official say the U.S. Department of Education is “concerned” any time there is a disparity. Secretary Arne Duncan was aware of discipline disparity problem when he was CEO and tried to fix it. That effort has yet to take hold.  
Later this week, look for the next installment of this series to address the scarcity of black male teachers and mentors. Experts say having teachers who look like their students and can relate to them is important for educational success. Yet, one in four students are black boys, but only 6 percent of Chicago’s teachers are black males.

Continue reading Catalyst's analysis: "Black male conundrum"

28 comments

A mom wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

I have two sons (neither have been suspended) in elementary school. At one of my children's school the principal suspended 8 boys in one day! I was appalled! The school is a small school with an enrollment of 299. Six of the boys were in the classroom with a sub. I agree something needs to be done about this.

Katherine Hogan wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

In Chicago we are currently undergoing a white-washing of many of our schools due to Renaissance 2010 turn-around schools. As CORE's law brief outlines, schools that are turned around lose many experienced African-American educators in turn for younger (also less diverse) teachers who do not have roots in the community.

Good teachers come in all ages and races, but having a strong connection to your students and the community they live in vastly improves connections that avoid situations where discipline becomes punitative instead of preventative.

Danny wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

Isn't it much more likely that "elementary schools and high schools are suspending and expelling students at alarming rates and African American male students are" MUCH MORE LIKELY TO ENGAGE IN BEHAVIORS THAT MERIT these punishments."

Teachers and school administrators aren't singling out black males for undeserved punishments. They are singling out the perpetrators of inappropriate behaviors.

And if your point is that black kids should only have black teachers, then doesn't it follow that white kids should have white teachers; Asian kids Asian teachers, and that we should forsake trying to teach kids to live in a multi-racial, multi-ethnic society?

I give this series an "F."

Ray Thompson - A Black Male wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

Response to Danny:

Perhaps the problem is the hiring of teachers who simply don't understand how to CONNECT to students who live in low-income communities. Let's be honest here Danny, this is not a race issue, it is a class issue. Those "teachers" in question, might be excellent at delivering and effectively executing their lesson plans. You place those "teachers" in a suburban and/or middle class school, 2 years later they are dressed up to receive a Golden Apple Award.

Those excellent teachers fail in low-income communities, not because poor students can't learn (thousands have proven students CAN, white and black teachers), but because the teacher has not expanded his/her "union-protected" professional skills to effectively educate low-income students. I will also admit educators do a poor job of effectively involving low-income parents in the education of their children. Authoritarian , educator - parent relationships will not work in our current high stakes environment.

If Coca-Cola can market it's products to the rich and poor, using different strategies (and make billions using both), why can't teachers learn to educate Black Males in low income communities?

Simplistic responses like "African American male students are" MUCH MORE LIKELY TO ENGAGE IN BEHAVIORS THAT MERIT these punishments," doesn't lead to any understanding or growth. Using excessive punishment in a school setting doesn't solve the problem.

Until educators and schools of education in America come to the conclusion that the well has run dry on the fundamental theories that govern their craft, things won't change. Factory style, industrial age education has no place in a technology-driven global society. Especially when the current crop of students were born into a digital age.

The Black Male that seems to get more attention in the class than your current instructional methods already knows the game. Instead of sending him to the main office for that 4th detention or suspension of the year - next time try building a relationship with the biggest trouble maker. Get to know him outside of school and gain his trust. Deliver on your commitments and watch his leadership potential blossom. Focus on his ASSETS, not his needs or imagined deficiencies, no matter how well documented they are in those IEP's. Get to know him on HIS level, then perhaps he will surprise you and show you that he is already a student of your "level".

CPS insider wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

Robert Spicer, director of programs for Community Justice for Youth Institute, says that as a black man who spent eight years teaching in CPS, he is not surprised that black boys are suspended and expelled more often. He questions whether teachers and administrators truly believe that educating black male students is important. “The district continues to fail them,†Spicer says.
MR. SPICER—why did you leave CPS, when you know we are desperate for black male teachers? You have failed them by NOT staying as a teacher—I know why--it’s hard work!

CPS scrapped its zero tolerance policy in 2006 in favor of restorative justice, which encourages schools to avoid punitive discipline and help students understand why their misbehavior is wrong and make restitution instead.
Where were the funds and training to learn how to do this in CPS schools? Where is the personnel?

Peter Cunningham, assistant secretary for communications and outreach under Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, says the department is interested in having all students treated “fairly and equally.â€
This is the pot calling the kettle black. Arne did nothing to fund this or help schools with this.
And when a student brings a weapon into school, when a student comes in high and/or is selling drugs and/or recruiting for his gang IN school, when a student physically assaults another student or employee, do the parents of all the other students in that school, want restorative justice or do they want THAT student out of the school FOR GOOD?

The majority of students in CPS are black. The majority who are left in Chicago, who were not chased out, are poorer, in extreme social and educational need, living in squalar and poorer housing than before, thanks to our mayor.

Eason-Watkins:…school principals largely determine what happens on their campus. “At the district level, we are really trying encourage schools to more responsive to the social and emotional needs of students,†she says.
WHAT?! Blame the principals agaiun BEW! So when do teachers get to teach and WE MUST follow the SCC or WE get in trouble for not doing this. STOP blaming the schools. STOP making the school responsible for ALL of this.
And please think about all the subs we have and all the new young and second career teachers CPS wants from Maine, Iowa and Alaska—yes, they are ready to teach urban youth!
WHERE AND WHEN DO THE PARENTS FIT IN ALL OF THIS?
OMG- Do you know how many hours it takes to do a misconduct report on the IMPACT system? Hey University of Chicago, did you ever think that the underreporting is because we cannot get the system to work for us in order to report it? You guys are so smart, why don’t you ask the right or obvious questions—because you are oblivious to what is going IN the schools, (except for your own charters,) even with all that consultant $$$ you get from CPS.
CPS lets the turnaround guy Dr. Don, just kick the students out! Now that’s Justice.

We tried Restorative Justice 2 times with 2 students. We had the social worker, a member of the police and the principal at the two meetings. One, the parent came but did not bring her son. She knew that she was to bring her son, but she told us he was in bed sleeping and she did not want to wake hime up—it was 9:30 on a school day.The other RJ session lasted 2.5 hours; behavior and attendand were serious issues. Mom and her child, an 8th grade student, cried, made-up and both claimed that they would work on imporving this child’s behavior and attendance. So the 2 day suspension (assault and cigarettes/lighter) was NOT implemented by the principal. Student never came back to school NEVER finished the SMART program either.

Crigler :“Teachers often fail to see how these programs can help them as opposed to providing more work for them, she explains. Some of them are veterans and from the old school of discipline, demanding quiet students who fall in line. Other teachers are from vastly different cultural backgrounds and can’t relate to students, assuming the worst too quickly when misbehavior erupts.â€
Please! Give me a break! Are you in the schools to see this—NO you are not. We have had a majority of black teachers and black principals in black student schools— Wake UP!

Mr. Thompson-a response wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

"If Coca-Cola can market it's products to the rich and poor, using different strategies (and make billions using both), why can't teachers learn to educate Black Males in low income communities?"

Sir, how much does Coca-Cola spend on marketing and advertising?

Also, there is a theory and I have heard this on WVON that the rise in suspensions for student disciplinary issues can be correlated with policies banning corporal punishment. Why can't we restore that?

Kyle wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

While I can't support my addition to this thread with anything other than my own observations, I do think there is some truth behind the statement that the high number of turnarounds, charters, and associated new teachers in low income areas could have a lot to do with increasing suspensions.

New principals, teachers, and staff that are not used to the behavior they see seem to me to over react. I have seen students actually arrested in addition to being suspended for saying something threating and a new teacher takes it as a serious statement rather than understanding it as a culturally accepted expression of anger.

I don't want to justify threatening statements or actions but it seems to me a lot of these suspensions happen because new teachers, staff, and principals are scared and just don't understand the behavior they are seeing. Likewise the students and parents often don't understand the reaction from the school either and things just spiral out of control with the final resolution being the student gives up and drops out.

I do want to add that I don't see race as being the issue. New black teachers are just as scared as new white teachers. I do agree it has more to do with the income level you come from than anything else.

Kyle

NCLB a factor? wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

What role does the onerous need to achieve AYP play in all of this? If a student is disruptive, it disrupts not only his/her education but that of all students in the classroom. Personnel working in the schools are under tremendous pressure to raise test scores and, now, to provide the "culture of calm" that Huberman likes to talk about all the time. Both of these factors make it too easy to use expulsion and in or out of school suspension to keep the peace so kids can do enough learning to make the adults look good.

the kid with the gun caught OFF campus wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

was well liked and smart IN school. The students knew he had a gun and was arrested 10 days before anyone at CPS told the principal--arrested on a weekend way off campus. Once the word got our that this students was suspended by the school-required under the SCC, it got our since the parent can say what they want, you know what the biggest concern of our students was? If he was going to ever come back to the school. They were afraid and DID not want him ever to come back--wake up RJ--the students have spoken!

L wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

"a new teacher takes it as a serious statement rather than understanding it as a culturally accepted expression of anger."

In what culture are threats accepted? Select CPS schools seem to be the only culture that accepts threats against teachers -- or other students!

I think one of the reasons why suspensions are increasing is because it is a reward to students, not a punishment. I have heard that CPS code defines out of school suspensions as EXCUSED absences. This year, I actually had students returning from suspension who told me I HAD to pass them because they were "excused" -- and they didnt even attempt to make up the work!

CPS should mandate that all schools have consistent and fairly used -- not just fair to students, but fair to teachers -- discipline procedures that include in-school suspensions. Require that the students complete some homework before even giving them bagged choke-sandwiches. It would be great if the schools could mandate that the repeat offenders clean up the campus, too, but Im sure somebody would file suit over that.

As for expulsions, school climates would be much improved if some of these students were expelled earlier. I think allowing violent or extremely disruptive students to roam the campuses of urban schools is a legacy of institutional racism that degrades the educational process.

Pete Ezo wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

CPS is cutting staff and trying too close the two schools who specialize in working with students with behavior disorders. Las Casas and Montefiore. Does this make sense? Both schools were getting hardly any referrals this year. I think some of these students could use some special help. What are they doing at the Office of Specialized services? Is anyone home?

Pete Ezo wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

CPS is cutting staff and trying too close the two schools who specialize in working with students with behavior disorders. Las Casas and Montefiore. Does this make sense? Both schools were getting hardly any referrals this year. I think some of these students could use some special help. What are they doing at the Office of Specialized services? Is anyone home?

steve wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

How many of these students have ever had a father in the home?

bob wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

Riot and Ruin

Personally I feel suspension is a loosing proposition. Now in almost every school
I ever worked at the discipline staff was all Black. Can we say a Black Man is a raciest
for suspending a black kid? Sending home a little jerk plays right into the hands of those
who don’t give a dam . The street is their campus anyhow suspension gives them
more time to attend .

I am old school, we must start dealing with our own problems. You two want to fight
OK, take these gloves, headgear, and mouthpiece. You go five rounds fool. Try that
And see how many fights you get.

But then that would eliminate about 75% of fights ,girls excluded. Hell we might
discover the next Sugar Ray. The answer is an ironclad system of structure. Not harsh
idiotic exclusion. That’s why so many of our kids excel in the military because for the first time what they do are the only things that count. But after 40 years I’m color blind
all the kids are green to me.

hall monitor wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

For more stories like this, check out http://detentionslip.org. It the leader for crazy school headlines.

Marvin wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

We must remember that, as a society, we are so quick to blame children's families for these problems when much of it is societal. The United States of America is one of the most violent societies in the world. We own more guns per capita than many small countries put together. We have more violent crimes than virtually anyone. And guess what? Black males are not the only perpetrators of these crimes. The disease of violence is widespread and it is deeply ingrained in our culture. We accept it, we even applaud it until it is directed at us or until someone who looks different than us is named the perpetrator. We need to speak out against violence in all forms. We also need to be much more involved in providing alternatives for kids who might turn to violence as a way to address other serious issues that are out of their control.

marvin wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

okay, but then why is it the school's responsibility to do all this? We have lost 2 generations of parents--they do not know how to parent and since there is vilence ALL aroung and supported in the USA, then why are their families like the Obamas and Michelles' parents? So easy to blame all else except for the 2 and it takes 2, who bring children into the world.

Marie wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

I have taught kids for 27 yrs. and the problem remains.The parents that really need to attend Open House, and parent conferences never show up.Our children are raising themselves and lack a stable, nuturing, disciplined environment.Our boys bring this chaos, anger, and defiance to school and teachers are unable to give the individualized attention that is needed.The cycle continues...
My book was written for boys, ages 9-12, "It's Crunch Time!", by Marie Brewer, www.helenbrewer.com (see excerpts) It is an interactive book of muscle for boys.

Carol Caref wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

From a study published in 2000, "The Color of Discipline" by By Russell J. Skiba, Robert S. Michael and Abra Carroll Nardo of the Indiana Education Policy Center: "No support was found for the hypothesis that African American students act out more than other students. Rather, African American students appear to be referred to the office for less serious and more subjective reasons."

Full report at: http://www.indiana.edu/~safeschl/cod.pdf

Carol Caref, CORE (Caucus of Rank and File Educators, coreteachers.org)

Parent wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

Restorative justice is in fact appealing. I say that as a parent whose son has at times both been victimized and threatened with expulsion (interestingly both growing out of the same chain of incidents). I can say that I would honestly have preferred a restorative justice approach when my son was a victim. As it was, the perpetrator returned to school unchanged after a suspension and the victimization continued until my son fought back, was caught and both faced possible expulsion. It was a fight, but we kept him in school AND got him moved to a class away from the kid who was victimizing him. But the roots went back over two school years in which the behavior was either overlooked, or "treated" through suspension.

But the commenter who brought up restorative justice is right. This is not a concept to be taken lightly. You don't simply declare it to be a policy and expect change. It is a sea change from "zero tolerance" and requires extensive training and massive support. I don't know Chicago schools, but in my district, discipline is doled out by the biggest and the blackest (former PE instructors if available). Justice requires a different skill set.

Claire Falk wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

I am a white teacher in a school that is 99% African American, with 95% of students living at or below the poverty line. I am a life-long resident of Chicago and a product of Chicago Public Schools. I spent 30 years in private industry and just finished my 5th year teaching. I teach at the high school level. There are a few thoughts I would like to put forth.

1. Teachers, principals, and all other staff within schools should not be expected to solve serious society-wide problems regarding racism and poverty. Our job first and foremost is to teach.

2. Most of my students live in single-parent homes and many do not live with their parents. Many have parents who have died, are incarcerated, or have drug, alcohol, or gang problems that keep them from providing the parenting that children need. Many of my students live with grandparents, great-grandparents, aunts, uncles, or older siblings.

3. Students in a school like mine experience a myriad of problems that students at North Side Prep or Walter Payton do not have to worry about and yet those schools receive a great deal of money while our school is always scrounging around for dollars here and there.

4. Schools in poverty neighborhoods need many more resources. We need smaller classes, more security to make sure that all students get to class in a timely manner, social services, and small medical clinics within the school.

5. We have an excellent teaching staff and all teachers are trying to keep as many of our students in school as possible. Most of us are putting in 15-20 hours every week for which we are not paid. When I have a student who consistenly disrupts class, he (and it is mostly males) is robbing all other students of their education time and that I do not allow. Suspension is the last resort. Parents are spoken to, parents are called to school for conferences, students are referred to social workers.

6. We do not have in-school suspension because a certified teacher has to run it and CPS does not allow us a position for that. When a student receives a suspension work from all teachers is sent home. It is my experience that it is very rarely completed and handed in.

7. This problem starts at birth or before. Unless we decide to spend some serious money in high quality pre-school education I do not believe this situation will change. There are mothers out there struggling mightily to keep their children safe and keep them in school but for high school males in my community the lure of the street is hard to overcome.

I am very interested in following this because I am disturbed by the number of African American males dropping out of school. The females in our school perform much better. They take school much more seriously, they study, and expect to go to college. Unless something is done quickly we will not only lose this generation but the next.

South side mom wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

This is why we are paying tuition for our son. CPS was failing him and it was clear in kindergarten that he wouldn't have a chance in life if we left him in CPS. I wanted to leave him in CPS, but watching the way black boys are treated and the ways they are screamed at, made to sit outside the principals office, and isolated from other students, and threatened with suspension left little room for hope. When a white boy acts up, they talk about solutions, when a black boy acts up they discipline him. White kids get coddled, get helped, get respect. Black boys get screamed at, threatened and isolated.

Ace wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

THE REAL ISSUE

Just to let you know the problem is not only in Chicago. Every school I visit out here in Los Angeles, I preach this to as many administrators and teachers that will listen(regardless of race). Here African-American students make up only 11% of the Los Angeles Unified School District student population, but are subject to 29% of all suspensions and 39% of all expulsions. You won't find those statistics spelled out on any of the district's websites. I had to look it up and do the math myself, because I needed to know just how bad the problem was. In the past year of telling these statistics, I have not found a teacher that knew what the numbers were related to this problem. African-American students are losing...BIG.

The problem is not the school system. The problem is community standard. Any group of people who allow school systems to do business as usual without developing specific programs that target the "real issues" students face is doomed to fail. You don't teach kids, who are being expelled at the rate stated above, reading, writing and math by teaching more reading writing and math.

Here folks is what I have found to be the real issue.......................Black educators, Black parents, Black community folks in general and as a collective are FEARFUL and ASHAMED of addressing with ferocity the dilema of SELF-LOATHING these kids carry to school with them everyday. If African-American students are not required to attend a class, at their school, that explains the root of a pain they don't even realize they have and steps toward removing their spirit from the collective pain body that permeates their community, we as a people will continue to fail.

I would much rather hear this from our two "fearless leaders" Rev. Al Sharpton and Rev. Jessie Jackson at their press conferences than addressing what the Jacksons should do about Michael's estate.

zeta wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

During this time of violence and instability at CPS, I would like to revisit this issue of student expulsions. With the number of African American children especially males expelled from CPS, where do you think the violence is coming from. When you have nearly 1,000 children expelled from CPS schools with nothing to do but run around jopining gangs and get into trouble. You are going to have an escalation of violence in the city. The policies and strategies that incompetent principals have regarding children with social-emotional issues is student expulsions. Even though you have a staff of people at every school paid to help these children. They are still expelled. At some schools principals have clout and use this clout to their advantage. At Edward White and several other schools some students have been given up to 4 expulsion hearings in a year. Because relatives work in the inspector generals office, the same students are dragged down to the law department every time they sneeze. The law department at CPS allows principals this privaledge
as they attack and misuse "At Risk" students. Unfortunately these students go neglected as everyone makes their money. This is one of the primary reasons why there is so much violence in these communities.

White School Teacher wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

Edward White Career Academy is a place where "at-risk " children get the boot. Even though it is a neighborhood school, this principal uses expulsion hearings as a selective enrollment process. The principal of White has no policy in space to deal with students that have social-emotional issues. Her strategy is to target these poor "at risk' students, (who by the way live in the community that she services) and try to expel them due to a lack of professional expertise on her part.

The mode of operation for children with issues at White is not tom provide the necessary services that they are entitled to under the law, but to began a relentless attack on these children, and taking them to a series of demoralizing expulsion hearings. The CPS Law Department supports her ritual of abuse and after repeated attempts to expel students, grants her wish.

The system is so corrupt at White that one student after being harrassed and taken to 5 expulsion hearings, expressed that she was happier and more excepted at the juvenile facility and never wanted to come back to White.

It's so sad when the result of these cruel actions is a life of disenfranchisement for these students who are cut off from the main stream culture.
CPS needs to give this principal what she has given children, the boot!

White School Teacher wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Black males suspended, expelled at increasing rate

Edward White Career Academy is a place where "at-risk " children get the boot. Even though it is a neighborhood school, this principal uses expulsion hearings as a selective enrollment process. The principal of White has no policy in space to deal with students that have social-emotional issues. Her strategy is to target these poor "at risk' students, (who by the way live in the community that she services) and try to expel them due to a lack of professional expertise on her part.

The mode of operation for children with issues at White is not tom provide the necessary services that they are entitled to under the law, but to began a relentless attack on these children, and taking them to a series of demoralizing expulsion hearings. The CPS Law Department supports her ritual of abuse and after repeated attempts to expel students, grants her wish.

The system is so corrupt at White that one student after being harrassed and taken to 5 expulsion hearings, expressed that she was happier and more excepted at the juvenile facility and never wanted to come back to White.

It's so sad when the result of these cruel actions is a life of disenfranchisement for these students who are cut off from the main stream culture.
CPS needs to give this principal what she has given children, the boot!

Taline wrote 1 year 28 weeks ago

BGriqEBiovBRhjMS

Dan [80];I recall the guys that cahugt the Bonds ball and sold it had to pay taxes.Emphais added.I wonder if the kid asked for or got an appearance fee for going on YES in game after catching the ball. I suspect not. He wasn't necessarily a great interview, but he could have done the Joaquin Phoenix routine on Letterman and still been worth $5-10k to the network.

Anonymous wrote 15 weeks 5 days ago

grandson was accused of harming a white teacher,thr

I don't live in chicago but we in Hartford,CT faces the same problems, being that I'm a grandparent raise 3 grandchildren of who were gifted and talent two making wise choices to finished high school now moved on being successful. However I have the last 13 attended a gifted academy being that their been all white teacher, now the principle using other persons of color to get him throw out, the para who should have been dealing with only one student seem to havebeen taking over those classes, I come to believe that principle who is white want to stay in the commuinty where blacks lived and have full control of how she runs this school, with the help from UCONN. No gun invovlement. and then you going to tell my grandson you tried your best and then in his file the same person that living in your community who is thier administrator is documenting their files....I'm concern and then her supervisor that is Black tell your grandchild he out of the door under her administration....I'm concern you being black say this to a black boy...hummmm so who is we saving the teachers who don't paid taxes in community and I see a disconnect being that the principle is 39 year old the same age as my adult children......

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