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Drugs in schools

Most drug violations in CPS involve an ounce or less of marijuana. Schools are quick to call police, yet rarely have the resources to offer education, counseling or other non-punitive help to students.

Real parents have been standing up

Just because a parent’s school selection isn’t a neighborhood school doesn’t disqualify them from advocating for excellent public education.

I moved to the Beverly community (the 19th ward) for many reasons—the anchor one being the strong public schools.  Within months of moving, the attendance boundaries were redrawn and I no longer was zoned to a high-performing public school. Student scores are just one of the many indicators of the school’s success. 

We are now zoned to the school where barely a third of 3rd-graders are reading at grade level and only 18% of their 8th graders are proficient in math.

My neighbor is a teacher at this school, so I asked her about it.  Her immediate response was that I should not send my daughter there.  We tried the selective enrollment process, and after having my daughter tested and waiting anxiously for many months, we were informed she didn’t test in but was placed on the 214th spot on the wait list. 

In Wendy Katten’s opinion piece earlier in the week, she asks real parents to please stand up.  I’m a real parent.  So are the parents who send their children to charter, magnet, and private schools.  We’ve gone beyond just standing up. 

My experience, unfortunately, has become the norm for many throughout our city.  According to the Illinois State Board of Education, there are about 18,000 parents who have been trying to get their children into a public school of their choice and instead are on charter school wait lists. 

My hope is that Ms. Katten wouldn’t discount non-neighborhood school parents and claim that they aren’t real.  She would then have to apply the same criteria to the many Chicago Teachers Union members who, during the strike, were dropping off their children to their charter and private schools.  It wouldn’t be fair to any parent who is exercising their freedom to choose the best school for their child. Just because a parent’s school selection isn’t a neighborhood school doesn’t disqualify them from advocating for excellent public education. 

In Katten’s piece, she describes the efforts of the organization I lead, Education Reform Now—the non-profit arm of our PAC, Democrats for Education Reform—in reaching out to CPS parents during and after the strike. 

We partnered with the Power of Parents, a group that for many years has worked with CPS parents providing workshops, trainings and conferences on equipping them with resources and information that will help them navigate the system and advocate for their children.   Partnerships and coalitions are very important, as Ms. Katten knows from experience.  Power of Parents joined forces in mobilizing the voices of CPS parents who were frustrated with the extension of the strike.  The simple message these parents decided they wanted to send to the CTU was to “educate while they negotiate.”  They weren’t alone. CPS parents were pulling together impromptu protests at CTU headquarters with similar messages.  Many, especially CPS parents and students, wanted the strike to end.   

There is a lot of work to be done and as I mentioned earlier, partnerships are necessary.  Much of what Ms. Katten mentioned are items we are fighting for as well.  Our intent wasn’t to upset parents from her organization by texting them with the invitation to attend the Power of Parents rally or see an inspiring film for free.  In fact, I would encourage those parents to simply text the response “STOP” and we will remove them from our list. 

Ms. Katten, it is clear to me that our organizations have issues we can work on together.  For instance, I’m certain you agree with us that low-performing charter schools should be closed.  We too want to see CPS authentically engage parents and key stakeholders in the important decisions being made.  It’s not just about policies but the process by which critical changes take place. 

We—Power of Parents included—would appreciate the opportunity to meet with you and discuss ways we can partner to ensure that someday soon, ALL children have access to excellent schools.   

Rebeca Nieves Huffman is executive director of Education Reform Now.

124 comments

Anonymous wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

well said

I've been frustrated by the name calling back and forth....everyone has some valid points and if you really want parent involvement, let's try actually acting like adults and allowing different view points to be heard.

Thanks.

Anonymous wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Lets start with the mayor

Let's first start with the mayor. If you saw the Noble Street Documentary, you would have seen the mayor and the makers calling names. Teachers were described and depicted as thugs and criminals !! Watch the video

Tale of Two Missions!!

Our own mayor was in the video and endorsed it!!!!!!! This is the same mayor who was "sponsored" by Democrats for Education to make videos and propaganda on the radio!!

This is why I m leery of her organization!!

Anonymous wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Thank You!!

This is such a humble response. Contrary to what I have been hearing about your organization, I appreciate your ability to be candid and open.

WendyK wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

I think you misread my post

Hi Rebecca- I would be happy to meet with you. I think you misunderstood my piece. I wasn't saying parents who choose charters or magnets or private schools aren't real parents. I was saying that hedge fund managers in NY are not real parents with knowledge of the system and I questioned why they are so involved in Chicago education reform. In addition, your Director of Policy informed me that DFER never claimed to be a parent group and I was mistaken in thinking of the group in that way.

I understand school choice. We have many parents in our group who exercise school choice. My group has been fighting for basic standards for all schools. We are in a district that hasn't provided art, music, technology, library, PE, recess to all students for years. Let's not even start with wraparound services. On a personal note, I personally know what it's like to have to go to bat to get something as simple as a proper 504 plan in this district.

In looking at funding on a school-by-school basis, we see how neighborhood schools often get short shrift. But we completely respect and understand decisions that parents make for the right here, right now.

Perhaps our main difference is we don't see school closings as an answer for under-performing schools, especially when they have been underfunded and neglected for so long. We are not against school choice but we believe having a choice means having a well-resourced neighborhood school. I don't understand how opening more charters and not addressing the basic unmet needs helps the system as a whole.

I am planning to work on a graduated income tax campaign for the next two years. Perhaps DFER can get on board.

Again, happy to meet with you to talk.

Jeanne Marie Olson wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

DFER's Emphasis

Rebeca, I would also encourage you to go back and read Wendy's article more carefully and thank you for responding to it.

I am a parent who has suspended any of my contributions to Democratic campaigns for the 2012 election since the DFER-funded ads featuring Rahm Emanual were aired.

I believe that DFER supporters who are parents care about their children and education. But I believe that DFER's priorities, strategies and emphasis are misplaced.

I am very tired of watching DFER blame inner-city teachers blamed for every problem in public education that discourages better CPS test scores. I don't like the misleading information that DFER provides. Did I like the strike? No. Did I understand why the teachers had to strike? Actually, yes. Am I pro-union? Let's say I'm not a fan of unions, but I understand why they are sometimes necessary. I would rather that teachers be treated as professionals and not battering rams or dispensable widgets--because I believe that the need for unions would be moot if that were to happen. Unfortunately, the multiple factors that have created the problems in public education in Chicago will not be solved by DFER's union busting and teacher bashing. The multi-generational poverty; the de-funding of public education (Local, State, Federal...especially in Illinois); the crime/safety issues; the lack of educational resources, the deplorable working conditions confronting teachers which make them difficult to recruit and retain; the constantly changing required standards and practices; the over-testing...let's work together to fix THOSE issues. And stop bashing the teachers who are working in EVERY type of school to help develop our children.

Chicago dad wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

I am for REAL choice, not illusions.

Real choice means parents can choose to have CPS properly fund their existing neighborhood school, give that school the resources for the things charters have on day 1 and not wait till a school is closed to then fix up the building before turning it over to a charter. Real choice means I get to decide that my tax dollars are not spent on useless Value Added teacher evaluations and their resulting waste of student learning time but go to high performing systems like PAR or Danielson. Real choice means we have an elected school board that listens to parents, very many of whom are far better versed in fact and research based solutions for our problems than our current board has ever shown itself to be. I want real, meaningful choice and input. I DO NOT want to have my intelligence insulted by deceptive sales pitches like Won't Back Down or other false claims by those who look at my children and see only dollar signs. I choose to pay for only one CEO of our schools, not for one for each of the charter management companies and their associated bureaucracies. That money should be spent on what benefits the class room, not the boardroom. This is what I choose, and front groups like DFER have kept these choices off the table and have denied the validity of the higher quality ones parents want.

Kathleen wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Working together

Kids and parents need as many sincere advocates as they can get. "Sincere" being the operative word. Let's hope an alliance is born!

CPS Teacher wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

To Ms. Huffman

Again with the school closings. This statement alone leads me to believe, Ms. Huffman, that you are out-of-touch with the real issues facing education today. School closings are not the answer to the educational woes in this city. The previous post (Ms. Olson) states many of the issues accurately. CPS does not represent teachers or quality education at all. Not even close. I am so tired of the finger pointing at teachers. I understand, on the surface, that it may seem obvious that teachers are initially to blame because of our close connection with the students, but shame on people who are not paying attention to what is going on in Springfield and in the unbiased media and with their own community members many of whom are teachers. CPS and the State of Illinois have starved the schools of the funding that is necessary for us to educate our children. Do people really think that we have that much control over what goes on in the schools? Really? Take a minute to talk to a teacher. You will need more than a minute because there is a hell of a lot to say. It is a disgrace how disrespectful people are to teachers and the teaching profession overall. Please don't say you stand with us and then say we need to get back to the classroom as soon as possible. Don't you think that if we hadn't been s*rewed so many times before from CPS that we would, in good faith, have gone back to the classroom where we want to be? Why do you think we held out for so long and, in my opinion, should not have gone back? How about no textbooks! How about no training for assessments that count as 30% of our job performance evaluation. How about bussing services that return kids at 5:30 or 6:00 in the afternoon and always break down. How about the fact that this extended day is a joke and we have no playground and the kids sit in the hot auditorium for recess. How about Madigan and his gang sneakily passing a Bill that would limit the right to strike over money and teacher accountability and not over having the authority to hold the State of Illinois' feet to the fire over lack of funding for education, safety of the students and crucial support that so many of our students need. How about we have some say, along with the parents, in how the school day should look, because I can certainly tell you that the powers that be certainly aren't looking out for your kids. I am pleading with you to work with us, not against us. Trust that when we (teachers) say we need to fight, then it is time to get ready. I know that society today dictates that everything be done yesterday, however, we all know the saying, all good things to those who wait. Sometimes being uncomfortable for a while makes us/others wake up. Many teachers had child care issues as well. You were not alone in the family struggle. Don't be deceived, the teachers are on your side and not working against you. Don't believe the media hype. Find out the truth. Talk to a teacher.

Chicago dad wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

DFER diversions

After re reading Wendy's piece, the only rational conclusion I can come to is that Rebecca deliberately responded to an article that was never written, to positions Wendy Katten never took. This is one of many reasons why I oppose the influence, indeed the very existence of groups like DFER: they consistently misrepresent the positions, beliefs and goals of those who oppose the profit driven, hostile takeover of public education. It is illustrative that those who oppose this privatization base their positions on facts while groups like DFER must default to an appeal to emotion in the absence of any solid basis for their policies.

CPS Parent wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

The List

"In fact, I would encourage those parents to simply text the response “STOP” and we will remove them from our list."

Again, I believe you misunderstood WHY parents were upset about being contacted by your organization -- not (only) because they were receiving unwanted messages, but because they were receiving them on private phone numbers which they had not given out. Personally I was contacted on a phone reserved entirely for friends, family members and CPS, in case they need to contact me for an emergency. So, I'm curious. How did DFER and and Education Reform Now get my number? I may not agree with your organization's politics, but it's your practices that repulse me.

Anonymous wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Well said from Chicago Dad

Well said from Chicago Dad "DFER: they consistently misrepresent the positions, beliefs and goals of those who oppose the profit driven, hostile takeover of public education. It is illustrative that those who oppose this privatization base their positions on facts while groups like DFER must default to an appeal to emotion in the absence of any solid basis for their position."

Kathleen wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Blame game?

Follow the money. Everyone who draws a paycheck, regardless of whether or not the students succeed - CPS or Charter - can be interpreted as having a conflict of interest and a personal agenda. Instead of perpetuating a culture of finger-pointing, how about everyone attached to schools through dollar signs decides to take responsibility for their role, instead of blaming someone else? How about they are ALL held accountable? Everyone can earn a living, as long as they produce real results. If they don't produce, what is their use?

CPS parent wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

It's clear that Education

It's clear that Education Reform Now is another group of Yes-men set up to promote the mayors stance. Just like the appointed school board.

Chicago dad wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

I second CPS Parent, "The List"

Since Rebecca is the leader of Ed Reform Now, I think it entirely fair to demand she publicly disclose or at the absolute least loudly advocate for the disclosure of how DFER got private phone numbers as described below. Totally unethical conduct for DFER to have obtained and used them. Completely unacceptable. Unless of course they were not obtained from CPS, in which case one must wonder at the cost of crunching all those data bases in such short time to produce an accurate robo-call list. Like the ad buy for Rahm-ney, it's money that would have been better spent in the classroom, not trying to leverage the buyout of Chicago's schools. This is just one of the costs of doing business for those "investing" in education with an eye on a huge ROI.

"In fact, I would encourage those parents to simply text the response “STOP” and we will remove them from our list."

Again, I believe you misunderstood WHY parents were upset about being contacted by your organization -- not (only) because they were receiving unwanted messages, but because they were receiving them on private phone numbers which they had not given out. Personally I was contacted on a phone reserved entirely for friends, family members and CPS, in case they need to contact me for an emergency. So, I'm curious. How did DFER and and Education Reform Now get my number? I may not agree with your organization's politics, but it's your practices that repulse me.

Anonymous wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

I don't know anything about

I don't know anything about phone numbers, but my bigger thing is everytime anyone talks about education, or slightly disagrees with the status quo, or is ok with quality schools no matter what kind of school they are - people get aaaangry. Chill out everyone. Seriously. What kind of example are we setting for our kids when we can't listen, communicate or even disagree respectfully.

Get it together. So many parents stay silent because they don't want to put themselves in the middle of all the yelling. I don't blame them.

Angela Rudolph wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

The List

I work with Education Reform Now and am happy to clarify, as I recently did via Twitter to Ms Katten and as Rebeca's posting above outlines, the recent outreach to parents was based on a list owned by our partner Power of Parents. DFER/ERN did not purchase a contact list for this outreach and we did not obtain it from CPS. Again, the list is owned by Power of Parents and via their partnership with us on these two recent events parents were contacted to attend a rally and a movie screening. If you would like to be removed please text STOP to have your name removed from the list.

Anonymous wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

You really missed it here Ms. Huffman--your job was to work

with yor neighborhood school and change it from the inside out--you know, get on the LSC, gather the parents from the poorer-side of beverly and change the school for the better-like at at Nettlehorst. Instead, you abandond the children in your own neighborhood and your school. Shame.

Ed Dziedzic wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Which school did Nieves-Huffman's children apply to?

To which public school did Ms. Nieves-Huffman try to send her two children? They are ages 3 and 2, so a little young for most schools. She makes it seem in her article that they are school age. They are not. Why the deception?

Chicago dad wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

The List

OK Angela, please ask Power of Parents how they obtained phone numbers that one can reasonably assume they should not have had access to and get back to us.

Chicago dad wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Blame Game? Not really.

Drawing a paycheck is not a conflict of interest and a personal agenda. Like too many people, you confuse performance with results. One can do their job extraordinarily well and yet not produce the desired outcome due to factors beyond their control. This happens a lot in all fields.
http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/on_performance/2011/10/performance_or_eff...
I for one would like to see far more accountability at the top where at the moment we have less than none.

a CPS teacher wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Education Reform Now doesn't speak for parents

Well put, Ms. Katten:

"Perhaps our main difference is we don't see school closings as an answer for under-performing schools, especially when they have been underfunded and neglected for so long. We are not against school choice but we believe having a choice means having a well-resourced neighborhood school. I don't understand how opening more charters and not addressing the basic unmet needs helps the system as a whole."

As a CPS teacher and a student of Chicago's school history, I have to agree. Ms. Huffman is no less real as a parent than Ms. Katten. But Ms. Huffman must acknowledge that her organization seeks to work on behalf of parents by attacking teachers and their unions and advocating school closings and charters. DFER and Education Reform Now are not parent organizations. As a teacher and a participant in the CTU (is your neighbor a CTU member?), I have to say that I feel disrespected and attacked by DFER and ERN. You may be a parent, but you are not a parent as your full-time job.

Anonymous wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

The style and the substance

Previous posters have already detected the deceptions cloaked in a tone of false humility. But I'll recap to make it easier for both employees of Education Reform Now to reply:

1.) What school in Beverly did Huffman's 2- and 3-year-old children apply to?

Barbara Vick is an excellent CPS preschool for at-risk children. If your child isn't at risk, the chances of him/her getting in are low, as priority is reserved for children who need more attention.

2.) What charter pre-school is your 3-year-old number 214 on the waiting list?

3.) Beverly has many high-quality preschool options. I'll name just a few here. The Catholic schools and Little Hands, Beverly Montesori, and The Castle. The well-run Park District has preschool programs, too; the preschoolers can take tumbling and swimming in the mornings. And there are storytimes at the local libraries. Did you honestly feel you -- a middle class parent -- had no other options after Vick?

4.) Did you honestly never stop to ask Power of Parents how they got the CPS parents' phone numbers? Please do so now.

5.) You must delete all names that Power of Parents "gave" to ERN.
It should not b up to us to Opt Out of something we never gave permission to and didn't know was going on. Stand up and stop the deception by doing this now.

6.) We know DFER and ERN and Whitney Tilson. But who is Power of Parents -- tell everyone who they are and who works for them.

Anonymous wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Why have hedge fund managers

Why have hedge fund managers sponsored false "grassroots" groups like DFER's Education Reform Now.

The same hedge fund managers who gave us the world the worst recession since the Great Depression through fraudulent mortgage backed instruments?

Now they want to help poor children?

Or is it because of the millions to be made?

UNO held another rally Wednsday, with charters yelling for more funding, even though they just received an increase? Why do they need another increase?

Is it because the mayor wants KIPP and Rocketship charter chains in Chicago and they need a higher profit margin?

We all know the CPS budget is under strain.

The more funding that goes to charters, the faster they open, and the faster they leach students from traditional public schools. Charters cause an under-enrollment problem, which CPS exploits in this way.

Principals are sent in to targeted public schools to strip away programs that involved parents like. They stop funding the preschool or an in-house gifted program. When the shiny, new charter opens, the involved parents pull their kids out and enroll them in the charter. The neighborhood public school, starved for funds and programs, and left with the kids whose parents were not aware, posts lower scores.

The now under-enrolled public school is also low-performng. And it must be closed, shedding more union teachers and forcing many students to cross gang lines.

Said in another way, when you privatize, the private school cherry picks the best-scoring students and leave the neighborhood school with the students who are more difficult to teach. And CPS Cental Office helps the charters to do just that.

Nice piece of work.

So the question is why. Why does the mayor and CPS push charters, when the budget is under great strain, and it would be fairer and better for the kids and their communities to provide support to existing schools?

Why do the private equity guys and hedge fund managers like Bruce Rauner and Whitney Tilson fund false "grassroots" groups to get their propaganda in the newspapers and on Catalyst in support of charters?

What is in it for the big money guys?

Well, there is big money to be made in the education market, in a number of ways. First we'll talk about a healthy tax credit only for wealthy investors.

Hedge fund managers created front groups like Democrats for Education Reform (DFER) and Stand for Children because of the Clinton-era New Markets Tax Credit.

It is worth 39% (!) and allows investors to double their money in 7 years -- risk-free!

Risk-free.

Can you imagine, in this low interest rate environment, what that means to these guys to have guaranteed rate of return that high? And remember, their income tax rate on that is 15% or less. (They are part of the Mitt Romney and Warren Buffett low tax rate club.)

http://www.schoolsmatter.info/2012/10/wall-street-profiteering-behind-ed...

But back to UNO.

UNO's rally is PR work for the same hedge fund managers and the mayor. Juan Rangel -- who never completed a college degree -- runs 13 charter schools. Or rather he presides at the head and takes a big salary of $236,000. A charter management operator actually runs the schools for him. Hedge fund managers call them CMO's and they like to invest in them, too.

Now, if you guessed that UNO's payments to its charter management operator are public knowledge, well, you would be wrong. UNO is a non-profit. So it doesn't have to provide any detailed financial information. The Open Meetings Act doesn't apply to it. And the Freedom of Information Act doesn't apply to it.

Finally, how did UNO get into the public relations / event management business?

You may recall that the New Schools Venture Fund (check to their web site, see who is working there to promote more charters) gave UNO a $250,000 contract to organize rallies in support of charters?

To be crystal clear, the investors in charters want to make it look as though there is public support for new charters -- so they pay UNO to organize protests. It is a perfect circle.

So we can expect busloads of charter teachers and students in bright t-shirts shaking tambourines. It’s a lot like the Rent-A-Protestor gaffe by Resolute Consulting and just more noise.

http://www.chicagonewscoop.org/pro-charter-group-rallying-to-build-support/

Why do other charters come to UNO rallies? Could it be because the hedge fund investors contribute a large portion of their charter school budgets?

Well, yes, as a matter of fact.

A 2010 Catalyst story describes a Ball State U. study that shows Chicago charters rely on private donations to a greater degree than any other major city!

No surprise then, that many charters were at the Wednesday rally.

What is surprising is that the investors in New Schools Venture demand money from CPS RIGHT NOW!

Maybe that is what Bruce Rauner meant when he declared war on CTU.

Maybe he intends to bankrupt CPS?

CPS is running a large deficit and it would not be prudent to undertake an aggressive expansion of chart. Especially when charters' performance is not measurably better.

That is right. Charters' performance is NOT measurably better than neighborhood public schools.

http://www.catalyst-chicago.org/news/2010/08/12/budget-landmines

Jill Wohl wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Power of Parents = CPS, not a "group"

The Power of Parents _is_ CPS. It is not a "group."

The Power of Parents was annual CPS conference which ran from 2003 until 2010 when it was abruptly cancelled. Bill Cosby came one year. Most years there were no sessions or materials in any other language but English (much to the dismay of the district's 65,000 families of English language learners, 85% of whom speak Spanish at home).

I originally wrote about the Power of Parents here:
http://ilraiseyourhand.org/content/what-happens-cps-stays-cps

The Power of Parents is a brand identity that CPS started, funded and put on the shelf. So now, in essence, CPS resurrected the brand, ran a "Power of Parents" rally and outsourced the work (and bill?) to DFER/ERN. If this is the case, why the insistence of CPS to disavow that they are behind Power of Parents, and gloss over the fact that they are partnering with a group with millions of hedge fund manager dollars -- not to bring books or resources to underserved children -- but to merely to amplify a talking points agenda, which like the Emperor's Clothes, is being challenged by parents, teachers and community members across the city.

For Angela and Rebecca to state and restate that the Power of Parents is "a group that for many years has worked with CPS" is wholly disingenuous. If they can't see the distinction, sadly, they've drunk their own Kool-Aid.

Anonymous wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Privatizing CPS

Obama's Race to the Top has also been called Race to the Trough.

RttT's Common Core standards created a uniform, scalable market from a highly fragmented one which was under local school board control.

This means economies of scale for charter management operators, book publishers and test developers like Pearson, McGraw Hill, and Amplify (which was previously called Murdoch's Wireless Generation), and online curriculum companies like K-12 Inc., Rocketship Education Charter (which was previously know as junk bond felon Mike Milkin's Krest Inc.)

So an investor can make money in the construction of new charter schools through the 39% tax credit, and through investments in various charter management operators, especially when they know which mayor or governor is pushing which charter chains. They can also invest in Pearson and Amplify as the rush to over-test our kids swings into full gear this fall.

And they can make money through the sale-leaseback of existing CPS neighborhood schools. The template for this is the parking meter deal.
CPS sells school buildings to investors, who upgrade the building and then rent it to the charter management operator. They can charge rent as they choose.

Then there is double-diping.

Some charter schools are also selling online curriculum (Rocketship Ed Charter.

Some charter schools are also selling management services.

northside teacher wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Real Teacher

I lover catalyst as a forum. BUT..when are they going to interviewe A REAL teacher about the stike in this section. It doesn seem to be Catalyst proganda page?? This and the education student seem like they were not created by one person?

Anonymous wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Catalyst

Please interview many K-12 teachers on the monstrous over-testing of our kids.

Jeanne Marie Olson wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Power of Parents = CPS. CPS gave list to DFER.

As pointed out in the response by Jill Wohl below on the history of Power of Parents. Power of Parents IS a CPS organization. This CPS organization released private parent data to DFER.

If you wish to contest that Power of Parents is a CPS organization, please confirm your contact at Power of Parents and how THEY obtained the list.

Anonymous wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Barnard Computer, Math and Science Center

Barnard Computer, Math and Science Center, 10354 S. Charles St.
This is an award-winning school in excellent standing. (Illinois Academic Improved Award, 2004) It is not on probation. It earned 78.6% of available points on the Performance Policy. It has long had a very well-regarded preschool; my nephew attended it.

ISATs
3rd Grade
Reading:
69% meet/exceed in 2011, up from 64%
Math: 94% meet/exceed in 2011, up from 68%

8th Grade
Reading: 94% meet/exceed in 2011, up from 84%
Math: 94% meet/exceed up from 62%

It has 266 students, 80.5% are low income, 10.5 % are Special Ed and 97% are black.

If this is Ms. Huffman's local neighborhood school, I wonder why she is complaining that she needs more choice?

How many charter schools can show this kind of achievement, Ms. Huffman?

Anonymous wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Catalyst

It's time to actually review the Op-Ed pieces youare writing for accuracy. Catalyst.

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